Meet MoFo’s Diverse IP Litigators: Arturo González

Arturo González is chair of MoFo’s Commercial Litigation & Trial Group and is well known for his bet-the-company, high-profile trial victories. He has been as successful at defending companies in $1 billion dollar lawsuits as he has been at securing head-turning verdicts for plaintiffs, including in Waymo v. Uber which resulted in a highly favorable settlement for Uber after only four days of trial. In addition to operating a leading business litigation practice, he has a strong personal commitment to social justice, recently working on several police-brutality civil rights cases, including a wrongful death/excessive force case against the City of Fresno.

How do you feel having a diverse practice group benefits the clients and/or industries you serve?

The ultimate factfinders are jurors — homemakers, teachers, mechanics, college students, and maybe an engineer. Those factfinders are increasingly and remarkably diverse. Most of our cases are tried in our largest cities and counties, and those urban areas are especially diverse. Indeed, in many of the jurisdictions where our clients’ cases are tried, you can expect at least a third of the jury pool to be diverse. California and Texas are two states where racial “minorities” have become the majority. How will those jurors view your clients or your case? Having a diverse trial team allows you to view your case through the lens of the diverse jurors who will decide it. MoFo understands that.

What words of wisdom do you have for the next generation of aspiring diverse lawyers?

Always be prepared, never cease learning, and listen to your clients. Whether attending a court hearing, a client meeting, or an internal meeting with your trial team, think about the purpose of the meeting and ask yourself, “What can I contribute.” Your opinions are valued, but you have to prepare.

Can you speak to the importance of mentorship in your career or perhaps the reasons why you are driven to mentor others?

When I first started at the firm, I was the only Latino lawyer. This was at a time when big firms weren’t hiring many Latinos, so I knew I needed to practice at the highest level possible. First, so that I didn’t let down those who mentored me, but also to not let down the Latino community and those who are seeking role models. I am glad to be in a position today where I can take the lessons I’ve learned to help the next generation of diverse lawyers who deserve a chance to represent their community the same way I have.

Read more from MoFo’s team of diverse IP litigators.